Difference between revisions of "CCCR Classification of Flammable Products"

From NexregWiki
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 172: Line 172:
  
  
==CCCR 2001: Section 42, Subsection 2: Sub-categories — one or more acids==
+
==CCCR 2001: Section 49, Subsection 2: Flammable liquid in a refillable spray container ==
A chemical product that contains one or more acids, is in the state set out in column 1 of the table to this subsection and has the properties set out in column 2, as determined under section 44, must be classified in the sub-category set out in column 3.
+
In the case of a liquid flammable product in a refillable spray container, the person responsible must
  
  
==CCCR 2001: Section 42 Subsection 2: Table - Sub-categories — one or more acids==
+
(a) determine both the product’s flash point, in accordance with section 50, and its flame projection and flashback, in accordance with section 52; and
  
  
<table border="1">
+
(b) classify the product in the most flammable sub-category of the applicable sub-categories as determined under items 3 and 7 of the table to subsection (1).
<tr>
+
<th>Item</th>
+
<th>Column 1<br><br>State</th>
+
<th>Column 2<br><br>Properties</th>
+
<th>Column 3<br><br>Sub-category</th>
+
  
</tr>
 
<tr>
 
<td rowspan="3">1.</td>
 
<td rowspan="3">Liquid</td>
 
<td>(<em>a</em>) a pH of not more than 1.0</td>
 
<td>Corrosive</td>
 
  
</tr>
 
<tr>
 
<td>(<em>b</em>) a pH of more than 1.0 but not more than 3.0, and an acid reserve of 5.0 or more</td>
 
<td>Corrosive</td>
 
</tr>
 
<tr>
 
<td>(<em>c</em>) a pH of more than 1.0 but not more than 3.0, and an acid reserve of 3.0 or more but less than 5.0</td>
 
  
<td>Irritant</td>
+
==CCCR Reference Manual - Sections 48 and 49==
</tr>
+
Health Canada's CCCR reference manual for sections 41 and 42 is available at: [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/indust/cccr-2001-rpccc/ref_man/sec-48-article_e.html CCCR Reference Manual, Sections 48 and 49].  One of the important points they note is as follows:
<tr>
+
<td rowspan="3" style="border-bottom:1px solid #000000;">2.</td>
+
<td rowspan="3" style="border-bottom:1px solid #000000;">Solid, paste or gel</td>
+
<td>(<em>a</em>) a pH of not more than 1.0</td>
+
  
<td>Corrosive</td>
 
</tr>
 
<tr>
 
<td>(<em>b</em>) a pH of more than 1.0 but not more than 3.0, and an acid reserve of 10.0 or more</td>
 
<td>Corrosive</td>
 
</tr>
 
  
<tr>
+
"The CCCR, 2001 criteria for gases are exactly the same as those for workplace chemicals under the requirements of WHMIS Division 1 of Class B (flammable gases).
<td>(<em>c</em>) a pH of more than 1.0 but not more than 3.0, and an acid reserve of 5.0 or more but less than 10.0</td>
+
<td>Irritant</td>
+
</tr>
+
</table>
+
  
  
==CCCR 2001: Section 42, Subsection 3: Sub-categories — one or more bases==
+
For liquids, the "flammable" classification has the same limit as WHMIS Division 2 of Class B (flammable liquids), however WHMIS does not distinguish a "very flammable" subcategory. The sub-category "very flammable" is intended for products which are too hazardous to be routinely made available to consumers who lack the specialized knowledge and training to use such products. The average household does not have in place the engineering controls necessary to react to the hazards posed by these products. The upper flash point criteria for the "combustible" sub-category harmonizes with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, but the WHMIS criteria for Division 3 of Class B (combustible liquids) sets the upper limit at 93.3°C, which is inappropriate for household conditions. Temperatures of 93.3°C, while being encountered in industrial settings, would rarely be met in the consumer environment.
A chemical product that contains one or more bases, is in the state set out in column 1 of the table to this subsection and has the properties set out in column 2, as determined under section 44, must be classified in the sub-category set out in column 3.  
+
  
  
==CCCR 2001: Section 42 Subsection 3: Table - Sub-categories — one or more bases==
+
With respect to solids, the CCCR, 2001 are not harmonized with WHMIS Division 4 of Class B (flammable solids).
  
  
<table border="1">
+
For spray containers, WHMIS classifies aerosol containers according to the same flame-projection test in Division 5 of Class B (flammable aerosols), but not pump-spray containers. Furthermore, WHMIS does not distinguish a "very flammable" subcategory for aerosol sprays.
<tr>
+
  
<th>Item</th>
 
<th>Column 1<br><br>State</th>
 
<th>Column 2<br><br>Properties</th>
 
<th>Column 3<br><br>Sub-category</th>
 
</tr>
 
  
<tr>
+
Finally, the criteria for spontaneous combustion in the CCCR, 2001 is also included in WHMIS Division 6 of Class B (reactive flammable materials)."
<td rowspan="4">1.</td>
+
<td rowspan="4">Liquid</td>
+
<td>(<em>a</em>) a pH of 13.0 or more</td>
+
<td>Corrosive</td>
+
</tr>
+
  
<tr>
 
<td>(<em>b</em>) a pH of less than 13.0 but not less than 11.0, and an alkali reserve of 5.0 or more</td>
 
<td>Corrosive</td>
 
</tr>
 
<tr>
 
<td>(<em>c</em>) a pH of less than 13.0 but not less than 12.0, and an alkali reserve of less than 5.0</td>
 
  
<td>Irritant</td>
+
==CCCR Technical Amendments - Sections 48 and 49==
</tr>
+
There are no references to section 48 or section 49 in the [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislation/acts-lois/techni_e.html Proposed Technical Amendments to the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001]
<tr>
+
<td>(<em>d</em>) a pH of less than 12.0 but not less than 11.0, and an alkali reserve of less than 5.0 but not less than 3.0</td>
+
<td>Irritant</td>
+
</tr>
+
 
+
<tr>
+
<td rowspan="3">2.</td>
+
<td rowspan="3">Solid, paste or gel</td>
+
<td>(<em>a</em>) a pH of 13.0 or more</td>
+
<td>Corrosive</td>
+
</tr>
+
 
+
<tr>
+
<td>(<em>b</em>) a pH of less than 13.0 but not less than 11.0, and an alkali reserve of 10.0 or more </td>
+
<td>Corrosive</td>
+
</tr>
+
<tr>
+
<td>(<em>c</em>) a pH of less than 13.0 but not less than 12.0, and an alkali reserve of less than 10.0</td>
+
 
+
<td>Irritant</td>
+
</tr>
+
</table>
+
 
+
 
+
==CCCR 2001: Section 42, Subsection 4: Sub-categories — substances causing necrosis or ulceration ==
+
A chemical product that contains substances described in paragraph 41(1)(d) that are capable of causing necrosis or ulceration, in a total concentration set out in column 1 of the table to this subsection, must be classified in the sub-category set out in column 2.
+
 
+
 
+
==CCCR 2001: Section 42 Subsection 4: Table - Sub-categories — substances causing necrosis or ulceration==
+
 
+
 
+
<table border="1">
+
<tr>
+
<th>Item</th>
+
<th>Column 1<br><br>Total concentration of the substances</th>
+
<th>Column 2<br><br>Sub-category</th>
+
</tr>
+
<tr>
+
<td>1.</td>
+
<td>5% or more</td>
+
<td>Corrosive</td>
+
 
+
</tr>
+
<tr>
+
<td>2.</td>
+
<td>1% or more but less than 5%</td>
+
<td>Irritant</td>
+
</tr>
+
</table>
+
 
+
 
+
 
+
==CCCR 2001: Section 42, Subsection 5: Sub-category — substances causing other effects==
+
A chemical product that contains substances that are capable of causing an effect described in paragraph 41(1)(e) in a total concentration of 5% or more must be classified in the sub-category '''irritant'''.
+
 
+
 
+
 
+
==CCCR Reference Manual - Sections 41 and 42==
+
Health Canada's CCCR reference manual for sections 41 and 42 is available at: [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/indust/cccr-2001-rpccc/ref_man/sec-41-article_e.html CCCR Reference Manual, Sections 41 and 42].  One of the important points they note is as follows:
+
 
+
"In general, the CCCR, 2001 classification criteria for corrosive products are harmonized with those for workplace chemicals under the requirements of the Controlled Products Regulations (CPR) of WHMIS. The "corrosive" subcategory is generally equivalent to WHMIS Class E - Corrosive Material. For example, CCCR, 2001 subsections 42(2) and (3) expand on the OECD No. 404 requirement of CPR paragraph 65(b), with regard to acid reserve and alkali reserve. However, the WHMIS criteria for mixtures containing a corrosive substance, in CPR paragraph 65(f), is more stringent, in that it applies when the substance is present at 1% concentration, rather than at 5% (total amount of all corrosive substances) in the CCCR, 2001. Note also that the WHMIS Class E criteria include the corrosion of metal, which is not included in the CCCR, 2001."
+
 
+
 
+
==CCCR Technical Amendments - Sections 41 and 42==
+
There are no references to section 41 or section 42 in the [http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislation/acts-lois/techni_e.html Proposed Technical Amendments to the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001]
+
  
  
Line 339: Line 224:
  
 
==Canadian Goverment Links==
 
==Canadian Goverment Links==
*[http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/indust/cccr-2001-rpccc/ref_man/sec-41-article_e.html CCCR Reference Manual, Sections 41 and 42]
+
*[http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/pubs/indust/cccr-2001-rpccc/ref_man/sec-48-article_e.html CCCR Reference Manual, Sections 48 and 49]
 
*[http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislation/acts-lois/techni_e.html Proposed Technical Amendments to the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001]
 
*[http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/cps-spc/legislation/acts-lois/techni_e.html Proposed Technical Amendments to the Consumer Chemicals and Containers Regulations, 2001]
  

Revision as of 11:24, 6 January 2008

Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox